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Microsporum

Gruby (1843) What is Microsporum? Microsporum is a filamentous fungus belonging to the ecological group of pathogenic fungi called dermatophytes. Dermatophytes are keratinous fungi, which feed on protein keratin found in animal skin, nails, horns, and hair. They sometimes cause skin infections in humans and animals known as “ringworm”. Like other dermatophytes, Microsporum belongs to …

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Aspergillus ustus

(Bainier) Thom & Church (1926) What is Aspergillus ustus? Aspergillus ustus is one of the most ubiquitous soil-borne Aspergillus species [1]. This species is distributed worldwide, mostly in the tropics and subtropics [1]. According to the records, it commonly grows in soil, forests, desert soils, salt-marsh, and unusual habitats such as uranium mines and bat …

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Zygomycetes

With today’s fast-paced lifestyle, it is hard to even notice what is going on around us. In an effort to maintain a high quality of life, we usually do not notice the constantly present but less visible phenomena that have a direct impact on our health. So it is with molds. Living with such a …

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Wallemia sebi

(Fr.) von Arx, 1970 Wallemia sebi is one of the seven species of the genus Wallemia. It is the most frequently isolated and best-studied species of the genus (1). The species is adapted to low water activity and can be found living in diverse, harsh environments. It is capable of contaminating food preserved with high …

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Wallemia

Fungi can be observed all around us. They can be found in the soil and air, on dead or living plant material and even on humans and other animals. Most fungi require relatively normal conditions in order to thrive. They generally enjoy temperate climates and the presence of water. In fact, in many cases they …

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Verticillium

What are Verticillium fungi? The genus Verticillium encompasses a cosmopolitan group of filamentous fungi, including several pathogenic species. Ecologically, Verticillium species can be mycopathogens (infecting other fungi), entomopathogens (infecting insects), and phytopathogenic (infecting plants – The most prominent species of this genus are notorious plant pathogen that causes vascular wilts of crop plants. What makes …

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Ulocladium

Preuss (1851) What is Ulocladium? The genus Ulocladium represents asexually reproducing saprophytic fungi, belonging to the family Pleosporaceae. These fungi mainly dissolve plant organic matter, and can often be found on substrates such as plant debris, lumber, paper, and water-damaged building materials. Certain species are plant pathogens and frequent food contaminants. Ulocladium spores are airborne …

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Trichosporon

Yeasts are part of the fungus kingdom, classified as members of classes Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. They are single-celled, eukaryotic microorganisms. Different yeast species are used for different purposes, but some yeast species are opportunistic pathogens that can cause infections in people with compromised immune systems. The most important such species are from the genus Candida. …

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Trichophyton

Fungi have affected us all at one point or another. Most fungi develop in natural settings, existing as decomposers in the soil or developing on plants. Nevertheless, some species of fungi affect human beings, either as mold developing in our buildings or on our food sources – or even worse – on our bodies. Trichophyton …

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Trichoderma viride

Pers. (1801) What is Trichoderma viride? Trichoderma is a fungal genus in the family Hypocreaceae. Species in this genus are mainly found in the soil, rotting wood, plants root systems. One of the most notable species from that genus, Trichoderma viride, is considered to be an opportunistic, non-virulent, symbiotic fungus and often used in biocontrol …

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